Allstate Tail Fins

Allstate Tail Fins – The Allstate automobile was the idea of Theodore V. Houser, vice president of merchandising for Sears in the late 1940s. Houser was also on the board of Kaiser-Frazer, a new and upcomming post World War II automaker. It was 1949 when Houser introduced the idea of marketing an American automobile under the popular Sears Allstate name. The Sears Allstate was to be sold at new automotive stores opened next to their retail store.


1952 Allstate Tail Fins
1952 Allstate Advertisement

Houser’s at first wanted the Allstate name placed on Kaiser-Frazer models. However, when the compact Henry J came along in 1951 he choose it because it was simple, inexpensive and very easy to mantain. It was not the first Sears car but the second. The first was a high wheeler made by The Sears Motor Car Works of Chicago, IL from 1906 to 1911.


1953 Allstate Tail Fins
1953 Allstate Tail Fins

The 1952 and 1953 Allstate’s were equpped with either a 134 cubic inch four cylinder engine that developed 68 horsepower in their Basic Sedan, Standard Sedan and Deluxe Sedan. A 161 cubic inch six cylinder engine rated at 80 horsepower was also available. The allstate used Allstate batteries, spark plugs and tube tires. Just about everything else was Henry J including the small tail fins on the rear quarter panels.